Class Notes May 2019

Rick Foster, 379 Dexter St., Denver, CO 80220; [email protected]

            As many of you know by now, Mark Cummins passed on Oct. 31, 2018, in the arms of his wife, Susan Hun Cummins, at their home in Saint Bruno-de Montarville, a suburb of Quebec City, Canada. After graduating from Williams with a degree in psychology, Mark obtained his doctorate from the University of Wisconsin at Madison and went on to teach at McGill University. You can read Mark’s published obituary at: http://bit.ly/MarkCummins.

            By the time you read this, we’ll be only a couple of weeks away from our class sojourn to Oxford University. Among those who were signed up in January were: Patience White and Alexandra Breed and their spouses. Patience and Alexandra were among the first participants in the Vassar/Williams exchange program. John Burns and wife Usha will be attending, as will Barbara and Fred Eames andmany more. Richard Wendorf decided to get a head start on the rest of us and, as of January 2019, is happily ensconced at Exeter College in Oxford for the winter planning for our arrival there in June and the side excursion to Bath, where he’ll be arranging a tour for us of the American Museum.

            John Burns also reports that he and wife Usha are planning to attend our 50th reunion. Their news: “Our son, Josh Burns ’02, and his family of five have moved in with us in our lower unit (we have a two-unit townhouse in SF). Having bought a new house in the suburbs that needed remodeling, they needed temporary housing, which we were happy to accommodate. Things are a bit crowded with all the bodies, but we are enjoying all the activity with our three grandchildren.” Others indicating that they will be at the 50th: John Black and his wife Linda, Don Berens and wife Maureen. Fred Eames also will be attending. He has been working with Don Berens and others, trying to round up classmates (for Fred, especially from Prospect House), to attend as well. Fred is nearly retired, continuing to do neuroradiology five to six days per month and sees Don frequently in their Mendelssohn Club men’s chorus. In January, Fred had a nice visit and dinner with Judy and Paul Willis ’71 in Williamstown, and more recently, hiked up the Mount Prospect trail in Williamstown for a splendid view of the campus.

            John Boyd wrote from Anchorage, “After almost 45 years of practice hanging up my stethoscope and calling it quits in September.”

            Gerry Stolz writes, “Helen andHalley Moriyama, along with their dog Sam, visited us in Savannah on their way down to Vero Beach. In addition, the team of Debbie and Ted May and Carri and Gerry Stolz recently won the husband-wife member-guest tournament at the Mays’ club in Palm Coast, Fla. I regularly see Dick Lamb and Paul Lieberman (both Class of ’71) because we all live at the Landings on Skidaway Island, Ga.” Bob Lee has had conversations on a variety of topics with Bill Wadt, Tom Sweeney and Bob Groban. He described them thus: “The ostensible topic in each case was the 50th, but my discussion with Bill veered off onto the charms of Santa Fe, the one with Tom drifted into politics, and the one with Bob wandered off into the vagaries of immigration law.”

            Bran Potter sent this personal reminder about the toll nearly five decades can take on our physical prowess: “As I was finishing my first mile in the Williams cross country team’s ‘Aluminum Bowl’ race in October, the undergraduate leaders were finishing their second. Grateful to still be moving and to see my former teammate, Pete Farwell ’73, as a venerable and much-loved coach. I’m back to teaching geology after a fall sabbatical.” It’s clear that Bill Lawson spends more time on the water than on land. He writes: “We had a wonderful summer at our lake house on Lake Charlevoix in northern Michigan. In November for my 70th birthday and our 40th wedding anniversary, we splurged for eight nights at the St. Regis in Manhattan. We saw seven plays—Harry Potter parts one and two, Come from Away, The Band’s Visit, American Son, Frozen and Dear Evan Hansen. Our favorites were Come from Away and the Potters. Excellent restaurants were Peasant in lower Manhattan and Estatorio Milos in midtown. We toured the 9/11 memorial, which is a must visit. We just returned from a two-week winter stay in Charlevoix and will soon be off to St. Barthelemy for two weeks. Then off to Longboat Key for 10 days in March and Southern California in April. We recently said goodbye to our dog Sammy, a Boykin spaniel, that was with us for over 15 years. A sad time for us. We wish all our our Purple Cow friends a healthy and happy 2019!”

            Dick Ginman, submitting perhaps for the first time ever, sent little information about himself but sent a picture of his 2-year-old granddaughter and the details of her Williams lineage: “I can’t remember the last time I sent something for the class notes, perhaps never, but couldn’t resist sending the attached picture of my granddaughter, Taylor Reager Ginman, riding a purple cow on her second birthday. She’s the daughter of Alex Ginman ’07 and Ellen (Wilk) Ginman ’07,the granddaughter of Art Wilk ’77 and me, and the great-great-granddaughter of Richard Taylor, Class of 1914. Both Art and I, along with our wives, were in Boston for the celebration.”

            Ray Kimball took time out from his January vacation and celebration of his birthday in Kauai, Hawaii, to write (complete with Emoji wearing sunglasses): “Had lunch with Paul Miller, Charlie Ebinger and Sheila Mason of the Williams Alumni Fund, in DC in December. Other than that, have a lot of post-holiday web stuff to catch up on when I get back. Really wish more folks who’ve committed to reunion would send me recent pics so we know what you look like now. Send to me or you can upload to your profile page at https://williams1970.com/. I’m going to look for an app that will take the 1970 Gul pic of those committed to the 50th reunion who haven’t sent me pics, and project what we think they look like now. Then when they send me a pic we can sub the real thing for the projection and compare. Should be fun!” Jeff Krull reported: “We have been making regular visits to Florida to see our son and his family. The grandkids are, of course, growing up awfully fast. Whenever we’re down there we try to connect with Shirley and Jack Maitland and Jenny and Lee Owen. Janelle and Sluggo Stearns are on the gulf side, so we don’t see them as much down there. I’ve been working with Mark Messing and Pat Bassett on our 50th reunion book. We will be asking classmates to submit bios, as we did for the 25th reunion book. So start thinking about what you want to say about your life in 250 words or less!

            Jim Deutsch, whose name hasn’t graced these notes in a while, wrote: “I’m continuing to work as a curator for the Smithsonian’s Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage—even through the recent federal government shutdown, because I am not a federal employee, and our offices are not in a federal facility. One of my colleagues, Logan Clark, who is the executive assistant at Smithsonian Folkways Recordings and an ethnomusicologist with a PhD from UCLA, was giving her parents a tour of our offices several months ago. As they were walking past my door, her father saw my name outside and said, ‘Hey, I went to college with this guy.’ Sure enough, Logan’s parents are Ron Clark and Lane Hammond ’71. A very nice coincidence.”

            Finally, in late January, Chris Williamson, Bob Bearman, Tom Michaels and I (Rick Foster) got together for Saturday afternoon drinks in Denver at the Arts Hotel, where Jim was staying for a Williams Alumni Fund event in Denver. Befitting our age, health-mindedness and regrets over college excesses, each of us ordered and consumed a full glass of ice water, nothing more! A good time was had by all.

Who’s Attending 50th Reunion?

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Who’s Attending the 50th Reunion, June 11-14, 2020?

By end of May, 2019, approximately 120 have committed for the 50th!

There are three (3) ways to see who’s attending:

New through May, 2019: Bruce Camp of Carter House and Jay McKenna of Garfield; 

New through April, 2019:
Bill Carney, Jerry ChristensenJim Deutsch, Rob Durkee, Nathan Fox, Andy Gero,Bob Groban, Alex Hansen, Hill Hastings, Larry Hollar,Tom Hudspeth, Tom Michaels, Peter Ogilvie, Fred Rhame, Cliff Robinson, Tom Sweeney

 

Pic

50th Reunion With Pictures! Back to Top
( If you don’t see your picture below, please send a recent picture to, or contact, Ray Kimball at [email protected].
If we’ve missed you and you plan to attend, please email Don Berens)
Links are to Classmate Profile Pages and House pages
Row “A”

Classmate 2


 


Classmate 5

Classmate 6

B

 

Classmate 6

Classmate 5
Classmate 6



Classmate 1



Classmate 5

Classmate 5

Classmate 4


6

3
 
 


 
 

 

“G”

4

 

4

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Classmate 1 


Classmate 4  




 

 

Classmate 6

Classmate 2

Classmate 3

Classmate 5


Classmate 1

Classmate 3


Classmate 5


Classmate 5

Classmate 6

 


Classmate 1

Classmate 3

Classmate 6

Classmate 5

Classmate 6

Classmate 2

Classmate 3

Classmate 4


Classmate 5










 

 

 

 

Classmate 3

Classmate 5

Classmate 6

1

2

3

4

5

6

 

 Alpha

Who’s Attending Reunion? Alphabetical list Back to Top
A – Kevin Austin
B – Chip Baker, John Bare, Tom Barr, Pat Bassett, Bob Bearman, Gary Bensen, Don Berens, John Black, Dave Blackford, Matt Bowman, Chris Bryan, Lou Buck, John Burns
C – Bruce Camp, Bob Campbell, Bill Carney, Jerry Christensen, Dick Cooch, John Cornwall, Kelly Corr, Tom Crowley, Doug Curtiss

D – Kim Dawson, Jim Deutsch
E – Fred Eames, Walter Earle, Charlie Ebinger
F – Vais Favrot, Rick Foster, Nathan Fox, Deitz Fry
G – Phil Geier, Andy Gero, Dick Ginman, Reed Gramse, Randy Greason, Phil Greenland, Bob Groban
H – Bill Hamilton, Alex Hansen, Hill Hastings, Gates Hawn, Rob Hershey, Jim Hewitt, Bob Hixon, Rick Hole. Larry Hollar, Tom Hudspeth,
I –
J –  Dan James, Tom Jamison
K –   Bob Katt, Kim Kelton, Ray Kimball, Jim Kirkland, Whit Knapp, Charlie Knox,   Jeff Krull, Kurli Kurlinski
L – Bob LeeHarvey Levin

M –  Russ MacDonnell, Jack Maitland, John Margraf, Ted May, Ken McCurdy, McCurdy, Joe, Rod McLeod, Jay McKenna, Mark Messing, Tom Michaels, Paul Miller, Bob Miller, Halley Moriyama, Jack Murray
N – Jay Nelson, Dave Norris
O –  Bob O’Connell, Peter Ogilvie, Lee Owen
P –  Bob Pasco, Bran Potter
Q
R –  Andy Rahl, Sully Read, Fred Rhame, Cliff Robinson, Bill Romaine, Jim Rubenstein

S –  George Sawaya, Charlie Sawyer, Peter Schulman, Joe Sensenbrenner, Joel Sklar, Jim Slade, Craig Smith, Dick SpiegelmanSluggo Stearns, Gerry Stoltz, Rob Stone, Kevin Sulllivan, Tom Sweeney
T –  Roger Taft, Peter Thorp, Rod Titcomb, Al Twaits
U
V –  Dick Vosburg
W – Bill WadtBob Ware, Larry Wellington, Giffy Whitbeck, Chris Williamson, Jennifer Wolcott
Y
Exchange Women – Alexandra Breed, Kit Armstrong , Carolyn Hendrie , Alexandra Kimberly-Bryant (Plip), Suzanne Reed

House
Attending Classmates Sorted by House: See these House links: Back to Top

Bascom  Berkshire  Brooks  Bryant  Carter  Fort Daniels  Garfield Gladden  Hopkins  Perry  Prospect Spencer  Tyler  Wood Exchange Students

Back to Top

Straithairn Shines in Amazon’s “Expanse.”

If you have Amazon Prime, you’re in for a treat!

David Straithairn energizes and delights in Abaddon’s Gate, the recently released Season 3 of Amazon Prime’s Sci-Fi series The Expanse.

Straithairn plays Klaes Ashford, a mathematician, spaceship commander, former pirate, and second-in-command of the converted Mormon Eternity Ship Nauvoo,, now the Belter warship Behemoth. Straithairn first appears in Delta-V, Episode 7, Season 3 of The Expanse .

If you’re perplexed by the above paragraph, welcome to some of the best sci-fi writing of the new millennium! The Expanse is based on the eight-volume sci-fi book series The Expanse by “James Corey,” a pen name for two authors who also wrote the television series. The Expanse (Amazon link) is worth the read, especially books 1 and 2.

Season 3 of the television series wraps up Book 2. It then introduces Straithairn’s character Klaes Ashford as Book 3, Abbadon’s Gate, begins. In the book series, Klaes Ashford is introduced immediately in Abaddon’s Gate, Chapter Two: Bull)

Straithairn plays perhaps the most humorous and delightful character we’ve seen him in recently, though others would know better. It’s certainly a wild departure from his great roles as the straight-laced CIA Deputy Director Noah Vosen in the 2007 The Bourne Ultimatum, and 2012’s The Bourne Legacy; the solid but deliberately understated Secretary of State William Henry Seward in Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln (2012); and his Academy Award nomination as Edward R. Morrow in Good Night and Good Luck.

Strathairn plays Klaes Ashford with spiked hair, a spry, wicked smile, the intelligence of a survivor, and a surprising tenderness that dwarfs the other actors in his scenes. He adapts a unique, indescribable Belter accent that sounds somewhere between South London and Scotland, and everywhere in between. When Straithairn appears, you start asking “Who is this guy? He’s strange! I want to know more!”

Basically, Straithairn saves a struggling series based on the weakest of the first three books of The Expanse series. Abaddon’s Gate, both the book and the Third Season, is not quite as searing as the two books and seasons before it. Straithairn’s Klaes Ashford changes all that. Straithairn comes into a wobbly plot and makes it worth watching.

When you place an Academy Award nominee into a series dominated by young actors still learning their craft, the contrasts are delightful and also obvious. Straithairn plays with an energy and a crafty uncertainty that keeps you a little off-balance, and wanting to know more.

You can’t wait for Klaes Ashford to appear in another scene.

Only two other actors in the series, (Shohreh Aghdashloo as UNN Earther Chrisjen Avasarala, and Elizabeth Mitchell as Minister Anna Volvodov) give performances that are as fresh, interesting, and believable. Straithairn definitely is the the best of the top three actors in the series: IMHO, of course. Reasonable minds can differ, but there’s no denying Dave Strathairn’s freshness and interest in an otherwise struggling third season.

I’d like to include Thomas Jane as detective Joe Miller among the show’s believable stars. But in Season 3 his character is played with just too many detective “cliches” to be believable. That may be because Miller appears in Season 3 as a “not-quite-dead” “protomolecule” who returns as a “ghost” to teach James Holden, the reputed “star” of the series, how to defeat “The Ring.” (You got all that, right?) The “stilted-ness” may be built into the “half-character” Miller, that Jane returns to play.

Obviously, we were thrilled to see Dave Straithairn in The Expanse. Dave is just captivating in this role. You can’t help but see his strength and depth as an actor, and delight in his Falstafian performance.

Did I like The Espanse? Yes. Should you watch the series and read the books? Yes. Should you seek out Dave Straithairn’s performances in Season 3? Yes!

My recommendation – but a mild recommendation only: Don’t just start with David’s appearance in Season 3. Seasons 1 and 2 are worth their weight because of the interesting plots. You may better appreciate Straithairn’s energizing Season 3 after you’ve seen the great stories and OK, not-quite monotonous acting in Seasons 1 and 2.